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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
CSPAN 08/31/2013
Echevarria: what is known as the Black Budget for intelligence and spy agencies, this information was provided to them by Edward Snowden. They have a follow up story in this morning’s paper looking at the cyberspace war saying U.S. intelligence services carried out 231 offensive cyber- operations in 2011, the leading edge of a clandestine campaign that embraces the internet as a theater of spying, sabotage and war, according to top-secret documents obtained by The Washington Post. That disclosure, in a classified intelligence budget provided by NSA leaker Edward Snowden, provides new evidence that the Obama administration's
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
CSPAN 08/31/2013
Echevarria continued: growing ranks of cyber warriors infiltrate and disrupt foreign computer networks. The scope and scale of offensive operations represented an evolution in policy, which in the past sought to preserve an international norm against acts of aggression in cyberspace, in part because U.S. economic and military power depend so heavily on computers. Quote, “The policy debate has moved so that offensive options are now more prominent,” said former deputy defense secretary William J. Lynn III, who has not seen the budget document and was speaking generally. “I think there’s more of a case made now that offensive cyberoperations can be an important element in deterring certain adversaries.”
Eamon Javers
CNBC Reporter
KQED 08/31/2013
Javers: Thanks to this leak from Edward Snowden,
Eamon Javers
CNBC Reporter
KQED 08/31/2013
Javers; Seeing amazing resurgence of the CIA in this era of drone warfare and clandestine warfare around the world, the CIA reporting a 14.7 billion-dollar budget, for itself. That makes it the biggest component of the intelligence community. For a long time a lot of folks had thought maybe the CIA was no longer the dominant player in U.S. intelligence, maybe it was the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency which flies satellites. Maybe the NSA was spending more money. But in fact we now know $14.7 billion going to the CIA every year.
Eamon Javers
CNBC Reporter
KQED 08/31/2013
Gharib: in terms of the budget numbers, how does it compare to what the US spent on intelligence a couple years ago? Javers: "The Washington Post" calculated this as best they could. It's very difficult to do because we don't really have historical information, either, just as we didn't have this information in the present day. But their best guess is this makes U.S. spending on intelligence now higher than it was even at the height of the cold war by, you know, $10 billion or so in current dollars. Gharib: Really adds up when you put iit all together.
Shakuntala Santhiran
Al Jazeera English presenter
ALJAZAM 09/01/2013
German news magazine Der Spiegel says al Jazeera has been hacked by America’s National Security Agency. The NSA reportedly started to access al Jazeera's internal communication during president George W. Bush's second term in office. Der Spiegel says the operation was described as a, quote, “notable success “in the files passed on to them by whistleblower Edward Snowden.
Nick Spicer
Al Jazeera English correspondent
ALJAZAM 09/01/2013
the German news magazine speculates it may be because al Jazeera was provided with audio cassettes and video recordings of senior leaders of al Qaeda. This is speculation. There's nothing in the documents revealed by Der Spiegel that suggest any other motivation. It's interesting it also says this is the first media organization that has been targeted by the National Security Agency in the United States, at least according to the documents made public by Edward Snowden.
Glenn Greenwald
Reporter for The Guardian
CNNW 09/01/2013
Stelter : Glenn, thanks for being here. In these last three months what have you personally learned from all of these disclosures? Greenwald: Well I think the main point is that the thing people most did not know is just how limitless the NSA's goals are when it comes to spying. What they're really doing is creating a spying system that literally has as its goal the elimination of privacy worldwide.
Glenn Greenwald
Reporter for The Guardian
CNNW 09/01/2013
The motto of General Alexander, who runs the NSA, which was pioneered in Iraq but then moved to American soil is, “collect it all.” In other words, every form of electronic communication that human beings have with one another should be collected, stored monitored and analyzed by the NSA. That's a very extraordinary thing to happen in a democracy with no public debate and no public knowledge. I think that's why the story has resonated the way it has.
Glenn Greenwald
Reporter for The Guardian
CNNW 09/01/2013
As you said the reports about the illegality and the abuse of spying have been things that have been self-reported. So how much abuse is there that they personally either haven't detected or haven't reported? I think a lot of the stories over the next two months are going to focus on exactly that question just how much abuse is there in this system.
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